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Making a Wooden Gear Clock-video

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See the wooden gear clock in motion

In the Summer 2013 issue of Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts, Brian Law offered patterns for a wooden gear clock. Test cutter Rolf Beuttenmuller documented his creation of the clock and provided helpful instruction, including an innovative gear shaping jig. Below is a video of the clock in motion. 

Wooden Clocks  SSW51  SIPGZM

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Comments (102 posted):

Rolf on 04/19/2013 18:30:22
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Now that I have the clock back in my possession I have decided to do a few tweaks that might be helpful. The "escapement" and the "Yoke" are a snug fit on the shaft (original design). For me it is a bit to easy to tweak it out of tune. So I put a bump on top of the Escapement and stretched the Yoke so that I can drill and tap a hole in it for a set screw. I will let you know how that works out. I attached a drawing compare it to the one in the magazine and you will see what I changed. Another heads up notice that the escapement has a different angle on each side. Make sure that during assembly the 25 deg is to the left while facing the clock. It will affect how it runs. It is a fun project !!
Block on 04/25/2013 10:46:56
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Really nice looking clock. I wish the escapement was more visible/prominent is all.
Rolf on 04/25/2013 11:26:26
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Block, The face is only pined on two dowels and easily removed. So you coud very easily create your own face to suit your taste.
Rolf on 04/30/2013 17:15:56
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I have had a couple of questions regarding the parts kit for the clock in the summer issue. So I thought I would post a couple of pictures of whats included for clarity. What you don't see is the labor and time involved in making them. The Kit uses 13+ inches of brass rod and about 5 inches of tubing, 3 brass washers and one nut, 2 counting me. The washers are solderd as you can see in the picture. If you want to order the kit send me a Private message by clicking on my name at the left. I do not provide any wooden parts or the weigths. As stated in the Magazine the cost is $22 + $5 shipping and handling. Or you have the option of ordering the raw materials from Mc master Carr and make your own. The part #'s are in the article.
mrkiwi on 05/12/2013 10:33:11
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Bonjour from Quebec.... I have a question about the Back supports.....(Wooden gear clock issue 51) How is it made....??? Do we need a Wood lathe for that...??? Richard
Rolf on 05/12/2013 10:46:48
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That would make it easy but, you could use two different diameters of dowel the smaller being half inch and drill a 1/2inch hole in the center of the larger piece. then glue them together. Similar to what I did in figure 8 page 51. The outer part does not have to be round. I hope this answers your ?.
mrkiwi on 05/12/2013 11:51:20
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Yes tank you. Also i like to by The Kit uses 13+ inches of brass rod and about 5 inches of tubing, 3 brass washers and one nut, Will you send it to me in Quebec, and how does it work. What is our address ?? Richard
Rolf on 05/12/2013 12:30:58
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I sent you a PM. I have not sent anything to Canada so I would have to check on postage.
mrkiwi on 05/12/2013 12:40:06
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I'm asking you that, because McMaster-carr doesn't deliver in Canada. Richard
Rolf on 05/12/2013 17:56:42
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Mc master was just my source for materials. I have been ordering it from them cutting all the bits to size (see the pictures above) I just ordered more material since I ran out. I have been sending a paypal invoice Is that available in Canada?
mrkiwi on 05/12/2013 19:13:57
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Yes it's available in Canada,but that's not the problem , Mc master doesn't deliver in Canada???
mrkiwi on 05/13/2013 16:54:02
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Hello i tried to send you an email but i receive a message [13:12:40] ###########: Final-Recipient:########### Action: failed Status: 5.5.0 Diagnostic-Code: smtp;554 The mail could not be delivered to the recipient because the domain is not reachable. Please check the domain and try again Richard
Rolf on 05/13/2013 17:32:14
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I sent you a PM the address is wrong. Just for your information it is not a good idea to post real e-mails in the forum. The moderators frown on that. so please delete the above.
Raswoodworking on 05/14/2013 11:18:27
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I saw the magazine in Lowes, and bought it just to make this clock. I am looking forward to trying this, and I am going to use my CNC machine to cut it out. I will be purchasing your brass parts once I get the time to set it all up. Thank you I have always wanted to make a wooden clock, and this one looks easy enough to start with. The directions are very thorough. Thanks, Rob
Rolf on 05/14/2013 12:38:22
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Rob, What is the challenge in that? You need to cut it on a scroll saw.:icon10: How will you be creating the g-code for the CNC (assuming it uses the standard code.)
evilbadger on 05/15/2013 08:14:51
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Rob You can buy the DXF files from Brian's site to help speed up writing the G-code. Here is a link Clock11
Scrolling Days on 05/15/2013 09:05:59
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Rolf, I finally got around to reading your article last night from beginning to end......you did a really nice job on it! Kudos also to Jon Deck for that fantastic "exploded" diagram. After reading the whole thing this might be too big of a bite for me to take right now, but I'm definitely inspired to give it a try at some point, and I'll hang on to the article for sure. I was curious about the "cutting the gears" process.....the article has the scroller cutting circumferentially outside of the teeth, and then hallowing out the gaps, and then using a sander to bring the wood down to the tip of each tooth. Would it be feasible just to follow the whole tooth pattern with the scrollsaw, and not worry about making the sanding jig/sanding of the residual wood? I'm sure there is a reason for doing it the way it is written, but I was just curious what that was.
evilbadger on 05/15/2013 09:24:51
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Shawn When you photocopy the pattern there is always a chance of distortion so leaving a little bit of wood and sanding assures you have a perfectly round gear. The first wooden clock I built the pattern had been photocopied so many times the gears were really distorted but there was enough play in the tooth spacing that it actually ran. There are a lot of different shaped gears out there today but the perfectly round ones are preferred when it comes to clock making.
Scrolling Days on 05/15/2013 09:32:00
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Thanks, Tim.......that makes a heck of a lot of sense. Knew there was a reason. :)
Scrolling Days on 05/15/2013 11:43:52
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As I ponder on this, another way of taking a short cut might be to make your pattern copy, and then, using your compass, draw out a circle true to the actual tooth size. If there is any distortion, the pencil line should correct than, and you can scroll to the pencil line on those teeth, instead of the pattern line. I think Rolf's sanding jig is really cool, but if the pattern copies true, or you can correct it with a compass, that might save a step. Plus, I admit to being lazy. ;) On the other hand, I guess if you use the jig, it will save on sanding the gears later. Plus it will absolutely guarantee roundness. If I end up trying this project, I'd probably go ahead and make the jig, in part because it simply looks fun to use, LOL. .
Rolf on 05/15/2013 12:45:09
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The reason I did the sanding. When I cut the teeth all the way to the tip, the plywood tended to chip out a bit especially some of the inner layers. This was eliminated when I just scrolled the gullets, and then the sanding of the tips removed any of the chip outs. The result was a much cleaner and perfectly round true gear. Tim, I never took pattern distortion into account since it is not something a scroller normally has to deal with. Shawn, that is a good idea if for no other reason but to check and make sure that the pattern is not distorted. I am sure there will be lots of great suggestions for easier techniques and design improvements which I hope will be shared. My spring loaded center punch was a critical tool for me when I marked the center of my gears. If the drill bit walks the whole gear will be screwed up.
Scrolling Days on 05/15/2013 13:13:22
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....My spring loaded center punch was a critical tool for me when I marked the center of my gears. If the drill bit walks the whole gear will be screwed up. LOL, that's a good tip, too......I would be the guy who would spend a great deal of time on this just to find out my gears were off center. :) I am attracted to the complexity of this project.....it's definitely intimidating, but the pride in the final outcome must be substantial. Thanks for the explanation for the sanding, Rolf. That makes sense, too. I can see chip outs being a problem, and your solution is a great one. I agree with Tim about the possibilities of pattern copy distortions as well. Everybody has a different type of copier, but almost none of them copy exactly true to size. A good way to test this is to make an "actual size" copy of a piece of lined paper. Hold the copy and the original up to the light, and follow the lines across the page. You'll probably notice that toward the end of the page, the lines start to separate from one another. Further, if copies are made of copies, the error compounds itself. The best idea is probably to make a bunch of copies from the original, at the same time, and save those......and always hang on the original. ;)
evilbadger on 05/15/2013 16:22:20
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Rolf Here is something to put on the wish list if you plan on trying other clocks. The good news is that it is not very expensive and it works great. H5781 Optical Punch Set I'm glad to hear that I'm not the only one with chip out problems when using plywood. Shawn Building a clock is challenging but it is also very rewarding once it is finished and you see it run for the first time.
Rolf on 05/15/2013 16:33:12
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Tim I like that, I plan on building one of Clayton Boyers fancy clocks or Kinetic machines. I will add this tool to my list. Shawn, It is not as complex as it might seem. This clock was a first for me on a lot of levels, making the clock, taking process pictures and writting for the article. And I had a very tight schedule. All worth it when I see what the SSWWC crew did with the article and the studio pictures are amazing to me. But like Tim said What a great feeling when it runs. It is different projects like this that keep my interest in scrolling tweaked.
evilbadger on 05/16/2013 07:50:23
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Rolf I have a pretty good start on Clayton's Birds of Paradise clock but have not had any shop time to work on it lately. I also have the plans for the Inclination clock and Cogitation kinetic sculpture. I think once the Birds of Paradise is finished though I am going to go old school and try a plan from the 1800's. Shawn this clock is one of the easier ones if you want complex try the one in my avatar you can find the plans here [url=http://members.iinet.net.au/~andronis/]http://members.iinet.net.au/~andronis/ If your having second thoughts look at Rolf's philosophy and just start cutting. Just be careful once you start clocks can be addicting.
mrkiwi on 05/17/2013 16:46:35
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Hello , i would like to know, did you find out about postage for Canada Delivery. Because McMasterr doesn't deliver in Canada, Merci Richard
Scrolling Days on 05/17/2013 22:52:04
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Mailing to Canada can be surprisingly expensive, which doesn't make a whole lot of sense since the countries are contiguous. You can go to www.usps.gov, and click on Canada as a destination to estimate mail prices, depending on what size package you have. The question is whether you have to complete customs paperwork. If you do, that can be a pain in the rear as well. I've mailed to Europe, and it wasn't simple......I'm not sure if you have to go thru all that when mailing to Canada, though.
Rolf on 05/18/2013 09:28:10
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Richard I sent you an e-mail on the 14th with the parts kit inventory. but to answere your ? the post office told me it would be about $10 postage, I am not sure about customs. I will be making up more kits this weekend. And will be in touch as I currently a bit behind on the kits. I was not prepared to make this many.
Scrolling Days on 05/18/2013 09:42:37
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......I was not prepared to make this many. On the plus side, at least that means your article is popular, Rolf. :) .
mrkiwi on 05/20/2013 13:55:30
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Richard I sent you an e-mail on the 14th with the parts kit inventory. but to answere your ? the post office told me it would be about $10 postage, I am not sure about customs. I will be making up more kits this weekend. And will be in touch as I currently a bit behind on the kits. I was not prepared to make this many. Hi i have one question ,,,, What is the ID. of the Washers. Richard Merci
Rolf on 05/20/2013 14:04:01
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Shawn you are absolutely right, it is a challenging but fun project and I hope some of them will be posted on this forum. I love the fact that the clock will be built.
Rolf on 05/20/2013 14:17:52
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Richard Brass Flat Washer 17/64" Screw Sz, 3/4" OD, .05"-.08" Thick, the hole is probably around .282 D It just slides over the tube Formable Brass (Alloy 260) Round Tube, 9/32" OD, 3' Length I clean the brass tube after cutting to length and the inside of the washer. Then with a small butane torch solder the washer in the proper location doing my best to make sure it is perpendicular to the tube.
mrkiwi on 05/20/2013 15:23:23
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ok tank you Richard
Rolf on 05/20/2013 17:03:04
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Richard are you going to make your own? It really is not all the difficult. It helps to have a metal lathe but I have cut the tubing on the scroll saw as long as I put a dowel in side it so that the tube doesn't get crushed.
mrkiwi on 05/21/2013 09:23:38
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Hello.... Yes, i will try to make my own . I still have problem get the washers,, but i will keep looking . Richard merci
Rolf on 05/21/2013 10:50:53
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Richard, get some brass washers from one of your local hardware stores, They could be 1/4 in ID and then drill the center hole with a 9/32 drill bit so that it slides over the tube. That is how I made the original and the tube pressed in nicely. I then did a fine bead of solder to keep it in place. The washer is only a stop and support for the gears.
mrkiwi on 05/21/2013 17:39:41
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Fine tank you i will. Richard merci
evilbadger on 05/21/2013 21:15:55
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Rolf What is your trick for drilling out washers? They usually spin on me but most of the time I'm working with steel washers not brass.
Rolf on 05/22/2013 08:01:04
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Tim it depends on how ambitious I am. I have a metal lathe so I chuck the washer in that when I need to do a bunch. But if I want to do it fast I put the washer down flat on a piece of wood and I grip the edges of the washer with a vise grip, just tight enough not to crush it. Then at a slower speed and feed drill the hole. Brass likes to grab The machinists that work for me tell me there is a special grind for drill that are used in brass but I don't worry about it. I finally ordered the washers from Mc master and the ID is perfect for this project.
Rolf on 06/26/2013 08:35:48
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As several people are making the clock I am getting some feedback about some problems etc. I will make my best effort to answere questions and post what I have learned. One of those is that the center hole dimension (7/32) for the weight pulley is wrong. The pulley should spin freely on the shaft and the pulley assembly gets glued to the ratchet (making sure the teeth are facing the right direction)
Alan Rudson on 06/26/2013 13:20:22
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Hi Rolf. Are you still making up the hardware kits for this clock? I sent you a PM the otherday on this, however, I'm a new member and may not have done it correctly. Thanks.
Rolf on 06/26/2013 15:14:36
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Alan I sent an e-mail to the address you sent me last night. I will send you a PM anyway. Yes I am still making them. I made a couple of sets last night.
Theswazinelson on 06/28/2013 12:15:00
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I'd like to purchase the kit. Will you ship to Swaziland? Regards Colin. Colin.c.nelson@icloud.com
Rolf on 07/05/2013 17:20:29
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Colin I sent you an e-mail.
banjodan on 08/07/2013 17:12:46
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what is the 1/16 dia hole in outer drum for? I assumed it was for the braided cord, but I didn't notice any mention of it.
Rolf on 08/08/2013 10:19:01
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Yes it is for the braided cord. I used flyfishing cord. I just had a thought about the pully. When I made the clock I turned the pully out of a solid piece. That made it a bit tricky to get the cord through the inner section. That is why for simplicity and easier fabrication I decided to make it out of 5 pieces. It would be really easy to put the cord through the center piece with a small knot on each side(to keep it from accidentaly being pulled out) Before assembling the pully.
Rolf on 08/08/2013 10:20:30
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Brian Laws web site has lots of great information to help with tuning the clocks.
jimd6441 on 08/25/2013 22:16:55
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How do I get the parts kit from you? jimd6441@yahoo.com
Rolf on 08/26/2013 07:56:58
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I sent you an e-mail
bobman on 09/10/2013 15:54:35
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Hi Rolf should the brass washers be 9/32 to fit over the tube in the mag it says 1/4 brass washers is this correct thanks. Bob
evilbadger on 09/10/2013 16:24:06
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Bob See post #37 on page 4 of this thread. You have to drill the 1/4" washer with a 9/32 bit.
bobman on 09/11/2013 04:35:03
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Thanks for the prompt answer tim
Rolf on 09/11/2013 08:28:23
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Tim Once again you are covering my butt, Thanks! Bobman, lightly sand the tube to get the oxide off, use some flux and just enough solder to completely wet the joint. The washer is just a stop shoulder no real mechanical stress on it. I use a small butane torch to do the soldering.
Rolf on 09/11/2013 08:31:35
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Has anyone finished a clock? We would sure love to see some pictures!!
banjodan on 09/12/2013 22:31:56
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Hello Rolf, I would be interested in a hardware kit. Could you please send me am e-mail b2593718zh@verizon.net
Rolf on 09/14/2013 11:32:58
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I just ordered more material so there will be a bit of a delay before I can make more kits. Banjodan your kit is ready o ship
celticpiper71 on 09/25/2013 16:52:47
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dear sir. I have all the pieces cut for the wooden gear clock and am putting it together. I have questions about the hour movement. the 2 inch 9/32 tube in the front does that get pressed into the spool and ratchet assembly ? also the 4 gears in the front of the clock, do they get pressed on or are they free spinning? and the magazine states 9pounds for the clock weight that seems heavy to me should it be ounces? Thank you for your time looking forward to posting a picture for you
Rolf on 09/26/2013 13:17:17
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CelticPiper, I am really looking forward to seeing pictures of a completed clock. My weight is 7.6 lbs. The Brian Law has 4 kg in the original design. I kept adding weight until my clock ran continuously. I have gotten permission from Bob to post the attached PDF file. The second page has a color drawing that shows what should be glued and what should rotate freely. I made some changes to this drawing by adding the backer and bushings in the frame for the shafts to rotate in. For all of you working on the clock this should be very helpful.
celticpiper71 on 09/28/2013 12:47:09
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heres what I got so far. I will have to file some deeper groves in some teeth it does bind at a couple of places, and I definitely want to add bushings in the frame.[ATTACH]61326[/ATTACH]
Rolf on 10/03/2013 08:04:51
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celtic piper I sent you a PM, Please contact me so that we can get you sorted out.
celticpiper71 on 10/09/2013 17:55:18
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ok I hung the clock on the wall with weight and it does work, so im off the weight jitters. the next question I have is about the pendulum. does the pivot contact the support? if so does the rod slide in the yoke? my pendulum rod is tight in the yoke right now and I cant get it to swing. it does if I lift the pivot up out of the support but I don't think that's right.
evilbadger on 10/09/2013 20:25:40
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celtic piper The pendulum pivot should rest on the support, with the yoke disengaged the pendulum should swing freely. The pendulum rod has to engage the yoke in order to keep the pendulum swinging. You have to remember the weight makes the clock run the pendulum just regulates how fast it runs, the weight drives the gear train up to the escape wheel, the escape wheel pushes the pallets which causes the yoke to move which also makes the pendulum move. The pendulum rod should be a close fit in the yoke but I usually do not make it tight. I like to leave just a little clearance somewhere between 1/64 to 1/32 is enough.
Rolf on 10/10/2013 07:57:27
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The pendulum rod should slide easily in the yoke, there should be no binding.
celticpiper71 on 10/10/2013 18:59:01
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thank you very much for your time I think I have enough info to make this clock run. I have to take a few days off though. some of my grandchildren saw it and they want to make something so I got kits for them of trains boats cars planes and such. so I will be teaching for a few days. I think it a good idea to teach the young, maybe they will find something better than video games. I will adjust the yoke this weekend and try running it next weekend. I will let you know how it works out.
Rolf on 10/11/2013 08:00:11
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It will take a bit of tweaking on the escapement. Very small adjustments between the yoke and the escapement.
stanbp64 on 02/09/2014 22:42:45
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I have a question about the pawl. Should it be glued to the pawl pivot, be a tight fit or loose fit? This is one area of the clock I am having trouble understanding. Thanks for the help. Stan
Rolf on 02/10/2014 08:25:36
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The Pawl moves a bit on the pin so Do not glue it. It should be a slip fit
stanbp64 on 02/10/2014 12:58:56
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Thank you!
Frilou on 03/21/2014 17:47:35
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Hi Rolf, I,d like to buy the hardware kit for the clock featured onthe front page of number 51 magazine. You can reply to : brassard.andr@videotron.ca Any info would be greatly welcome. Moderator's Note: Hi, Frilou....welcome to the forum. I moved your post to the relevant thread. Probably the best way to make sure Rolf gets your request is to send him a PM. Just click on his username, and you'll see the option.
stanbp64 on 04/18/2014 15:42:58
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Here are a couple of pics of my clock 11. Since taking the pics I have finished the weight box same finish as clock dial. Still doing some fine tuning so it is not running perfectly yet. I have probably made every piece on this clock at least twice.....it is a fairly challenging project for a beginner!! Thanks to Rolf for the hardware kit. Stan
Rolf on 04/18/2014 17:28:56
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Stan Thank you for posting pictures of your clock. I have sent out 51 Kits and you are the first to post pictures. One other person contacted me to say it ran beautifuly. This was my first clock also.
evilbadger on 04/21/2014 07:34:54
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Nice job Stan. Wooden geared clocks are always a challenge but once you get it tuned they provide years of enjoyment.
stanbp64 on 06/01/2014 19:44:03
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Here are a couple pics of clock after I made a different frame and backing plate for it. I have also made another weight box that is smaller but the stain is drying on it. Clock actually runs with less weight now. Trying to design my own clock next... Stan
Rolf on 06/01/2014 22:28:03
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I really like your changes. It is a beauty! The use of a box for the weight gives you a ton of design possibilities.
dusmif on 06/09/2014 20:13:26
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I really like your changes. It is a beauty! The use of a box for the weight gives you a ton of design possibilities. Hi, I am a new member, and this is my first post. I am building the Brain Law No 11 wooden clock, that is why I am reading this post. Can anyone give me any dimensions of the weight box to hold about 6 lbs of lead shot? Thanks for any help, which is very much appreciated. Regards Alfred.
Rolf on 06/10/2014 08:13:10
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A couple of things have been brought to my attention, I am surprised no one else has mentioned them. Part "V" the bottom shaft sleeve (page 58) should be 49.5mm not 51. Also Not mentioned in the article is that Gear "Z " 66 tooth is glued to the main shaft sleeve "Y" which will be glued to the main shaft "A1". I may have have noted it earlier but the hour sleeve "O1" is 12mm (.47") not the 2" listed. Also in post #59 there is a PDF attachment of the original drawings that may be helpful with some of your questions.
Rolf on 06/10/2014 08:25:52
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Regarding the weight Check out this link Volume to Weight conversions for common substances and materials If I read it correctly it is about .41 lbs per cubic inch so about 15 cubic inches. It would be interesting to hear from some of the others how much weight they used to make the clock run. Also what they used.
dusmif on 06/30/2014 14:57:33
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Hi All, As I have said I am trying to build Brain Law No 11 Clock; All the parts are made by a scroll saw, I do not have CNC. I had some problems, all could be solved, but the most problem I have and it is giving me a hard time to make ( as perfect as possible) is part no 39, Sleeve second Shaft. All my sleeves I have done them on my lathe with no problems, clean and strong because I use good wood and I can finish them well. But the no 39 is the problem one, as I bore the 6mm and then turn the wood to 8mm ( outside diameter.) I am having the 6mm hole a bit off centre on the other end opposite the entering of the drill, due because it is a bit long for the drill bit go straight; with the result that the shaft will wobble a little, but enough to touch the 66 gear wheel no 2 at one point. I will appreciate very much if anybody explain what is the best method to make this part.
Rolf on 06/30/2014 17:14:49
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Dusmif, Welcome to the forum! First I am impressed that you have made all of the pieces out of wood. The "sleeve second shaft" part #39, should be brass. But if you have to make it out of wood, I would drill the center hole first then mount that on a mandrel. Then mount the mandrel with the wood in your lathe. Now when you turn the outside it will be true to the center hole. Leave it as thick as possible you can always make the hole in the gear (70 teeth #1) a bit bigger. But not so thick that it interferes with gear (66 teeth #2) If you have more problems send me a private message by clicking on my name and select private message. No parts for the clock that I made for the magazine were made with a CNC.
dusmif on 06/30/2014 19:36:08
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Thanks mate, I will have try as you said. This is the only part left except for the face and numbers.
dusmif on 07/01/2014 04:43:55
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Ok, this morning I finished making part no 39 Sleeve for second shaft, 8mm outside diameter, I made small attachment for the wood dowel so that I could turn it between centres; crude, but it did the job. Now I hope it will work after all.
Rolf on 07/01/2014 07:47:48
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You are good! What kind of lathe are you using? can you post a picture of it. I look forward to seeing your all wood clock finished. Pay special attention to the numeral location when you do the clock face. I have one number slightly out of place and it drives me crazy.
dusmif on 07/01/2014 12:44:26
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Hi Rolf, Thank you for your kind compliment. This is my first wooden clock and I was more interested to see it working so I didnít put too much effort in the finishing, that will be my next one, I hope. The lathe is for small engineering work which is a hobby of mine. Sometimes a do my own tools for a particular job and one that I am bit proud about it is the collets chuck that I made from scratch, the collets and the nut I bought them, but all the chuck, tapering and screwing thread were done on the same lathe with this chuck I can work small parts which could not be so easy on a 3 jaw chuck. The photo is the first time I assembled the clock, which was very stiff to work smoothly, so I had to do all the sleeves all over again especially the no 39 which was the cause for this hindrance, now it seems ok this week I will try it with some weights and hope it will work. Thanks for the numbers tip I know how you feel. Regards, Alf.
Rolf on 07/01/2014 12:53:14
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That is a nice lathe, I never saw a Craftsman metal lathe and with a quick change gearbox. I have a very old Logan. Nice job on the collet chuck.
dusmif on 07/22/2014 22:28:11
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Ok, after 3 escapement wheels I manages to run my clock on 6 Lbs of weight, but I think I will increase the weight to 7 Lbs for better performance. I changed the ratchet system so that the driving force is from two sides instead of one which I think makes the driving force more even. Here is a link to my testing stage: [FONT=Agency FB][SIZE=4][COLOR=#0000ff]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_eU-c52vZs[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT] Alf.
Rolf on 07/23/2014 08:04:37
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YEA!!! That is exciting, do you have a picture that shows your changes to the ratchet system? Great video. It feels good when it runs for the first time. Have you seen the Fall 2014 Issue of SSWWC magazine yet?
dusmif on 07/23/2014 14:30:54
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Hi Rolf, Yes you are right, seeing it working is like winning the lottery, I was like a child with a new toy. :smile_old: To day I finished the face with numbers and by next week I hope it will be running, but before I assembly it I will try to take a couple of photos of the ratchet and will post them. No I have not seen the Fall 2014 Issue of SSWWC magazine yet, sorry to say. Regards Alf.
dusmif on 07/26/2014 12:29:02
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Right, here is my modification to the ratchet to the driving wheel, as always when I am experimenting with an idea I try to do the model reversal able so that if it does not work I will not waste any parts. As you can see from photo the ratchet is not fixed to the wheel, as I said if it didn’t work I would not waste the wheel. No 2 photo shows the locking stubs which I think they are stronger. No 3 is the setup from behind the wheel the small dowels are pushing the wheel from both ends. Mo 4 and No 5 are self-explained. Now I am trying to reduce the size of this ratchet and make it more practical, but it works fine. Any comments are welcome. Final Video of this clock is at : [FONT=Agency FB][COLOR=#0000ff]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAOVsICQHms&feature=youtu.be[/COLOR][/FONT] Alf.
evilbadger on 07/27/2014 08:25:05
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Nice work Alf. I hope you know once the clock bug bites you it does not go away. Hopefully we will see more clocks from you in the near future.
Rolf on 07/27/2014 09:09:05
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Alf you should design your own clock, it seems you have the skillset to do it. There is a really fun one in the Fall issue.
dusmif on 07/27/2014 11:17:00
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Thanks Tim,
dusmif on 07/27/2014 11:21:06
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Alf you should design your own clock, it seems you have the skillset to do it. There is a really fun one in the Fall issue. Thanks Rolf, I don't think I can go that far.:)
dusmif on 08/03/2014 04:47:36
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Hi all, Just a point of information that it might be useful. After I was not quite happy with the performance of my clock I decided to experiment a little with the weights and I found out that by reducing the weights from7 lbs to nearly 4 lbs it is working more smoothly and keeping better time. Alf.
Rolf on 08/03/2014 13:02:02
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That is very interesting! But to do that you must have made a very well tuned clock.
dusmif on 08/04/2014 14:08:43
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That is very interesting! But to do that you must have made a very well tuned clock. Well from my last post I again made some modifications to the weights since at some point even after 30min working fine sometimes it stops and I have to give it small push to the escapement wheel , so I increased the weight to 5lbs. It seems to tune it is taking more time them making it .:rolleyes_old: Alf.
Rolf on 08/04/2014 18:53:32
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that, I believe is the nature of the beast!
dusmif on 08/05/2014 05:03:33
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that, I believe is the nature of the beast! Ok, this is my last post otherwise it will get boring talking about the same subject for a long time. As I said with 4 lbs it was working ok for at least 3 hours, but it will stop occasionally now and then, but with a small push to the escapement wheel it will start again without any problems. So I decided to put a 5 lbs weight and this also had the same effect, working for at least 3 hours or so and it will stop until I push the escapement wheel. My conclusion is that the best weight was the 4 lbs which made the clock run smooth and more accurate in time keeping. The 5 lbs weight made little improvement, but it is not as smooth as the 4lbs. If I put again the 6 Ĺ lbs weight again as it was before it will work without any problems for all the time the cord will last, but it is not so smooth and even the sound is not pleasing. I think there are a couple of gear teeth that needs attention that are causing the stoppage. The other problem which it is main one is that I am having a hard time setting of the Pallets and the Yoke/Crutch to work in synchronization for a good time beat. Cutting the gear wheels was easier then setting the clock. :D I will tackle this problem as soon as I finish the next project; another wooden clock. Thank you ALL for your help, especially Rolf for your support. Alf
Rolf on 08/05/2014 09:09:19
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What is your next clock?
dusmif on 08/05/2014 11:11:31
evilbadger on 08/06/2014 17:31:03
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Alf Maybe you want to step up a notch and try the one in my avatar. If I remember correctly it has 32 gears in a 60mm spacing. Here is a link for the plans [url=http://members.iinet.net.au/~andronis/]http://members.iinet.net.au/~andronis/
Rolf on 08/06/2014 21:19:03
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Now that's one I will have to build, wow!
dusmif on 08/07/2014 06:41:29
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Alf Maybe you want to step up a notch and try the one in my avatar. If I remember correctly it has 32 gears in a 60mm spacing. Here is a link for the plans [url=http://members.iinet.net.au/~andronis/]http://members.iinet.net.au/~andronis/ Thanks Tim for the link, it is a H... of a clock, if you have build this you are good man. The plans are very good, never seen before like them, by my first study there is lots and lots of work and concentration to do this clock and to tell you the truth I am not sure that I can do a project this big; I have to study more deeply the plans and maybe in the future I will have a go, nothing to loose I have plenty of time.:) Alf.
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