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Scroll Saw Joinery

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Making the table saw jigs

You will need a table saw jig, to make hinges, cut box sides, cut slots in box sides for the box bottom, and to cut the 45 degree beveled box corners. My table saw jig is 20" x 24", but, if you have a smaller table saw you will need to adjust the measurements to your saw.

 

 

Table Saw Shooting Board

Step 1: Lower your table saw blade below the table saw top. Place the two bottom rails in the miter slots. Make sure that they slide freely in the slots and have no side-to-side play. Also,the rail should stick up an 1⁄8" above the surface of the table saw top.

Step 2: Center the plywood base on the rails. With a pencil mark both rail ends with a line thru the plywood base. Put a thin layer of glue on both rails, we don’t want much glue squeezed out on the rails. Place the plywood base on the rails using your pencil lines to line up the base with the rails. Allow the glue to set for four hours.

Step 3: Apply glue to one edge of each of the 11⁄2" x 31⁄2" front and back grips. Without disturbing the plywood base, place the grips, glued side down on the front and back of the plywood base. Let the glue dry overnight.

Step 4: Remove the table saw jig, raise the saw blade to it’s highest position at 90° turn the table saw on. Place the table saw jig rails in the miter slots at the front of the table saw. Slowly slide the jig toward the back of the saw until the blade kerf cut is about 1" from the front grip of the jig. Turn off the table saw. Use a square to mark a pencil line 90° from the saw kerf, about 2” from the front grip for the length of the jig. Glue the 3⁄4" x 3⁄4" x 24” work piece support onto the pencil line. Let the glue dry for four hours before using.

Table Saw 90° Jig

Step 1: On your table saw jig place a single sheet of newspaper to the right of the saw kerf. Place one 3⁄4" x 3⁄4" x 10" piece of oak on the work piece support and one 3⁄4" x 3⁄4" x 10" piece of oak on the saw blade kerf cut to form a 90-degree angle.

Step 2: Glue and place two pieces of 3⁄4" x 4" x 8" plywood (leftover from building table saw jig), inside the 90-degree angle formed by the oak pieces.

Step 3: Form another 90-degree angle on top of the plywood surface using two 3⁄4" x 3⁄4" x 8" pieces of oak.

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Comments (4 posted):

mtwoodguy on 12/29/2010 09:10:25
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This seems to be a very useful jig, however the directions are very unclear. I would like more information on using it to make the joints.
JimSawyer on 12/29/2010 09:24:07
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If the name of the article is scroll saw joinery, why is it giving me instruction on table saw joinery. I live in an apartment with my shop in one large bedroom. I'm lucky the landlord lets me keep my scrollsaw. A table saw would be out of the question.
wood-n-things on 12/29/2010 10:51:34
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Making the table saw jigs You will need a table saw jig, to make hinges, cut box sides, cut slots in box sides for the box bottom, and to cut the 45 degree beveled box corners. My table saw jig is 20" x 24", but, if you have a smaller table saw you will need to adjust the measurements to your saw. I'm thinking Article Bot's gyro's are jammed. This is for table saw joinery not scroll saw joinery...
SawTooth on 03/10/2012 18:54:57
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It appears that nobody's been in this thread for a while... but I can clear up some of the confusion: The concept of scroll saw joinery as presented by MacKay is not really scroll saw joinery... it is the appearance of scroll saw joinery. The box sides are each made of 3 pieces of wood: a long center piece and 2 contrasting end pieces that join the center piece in a pattern that looks like dovetails, etc. This is where the "scroll saw joinery" is done... not at the corners as you would think. The four sides of the box are actually mitered at 45 degrees and glued like any other mitered-corner box. Cutting the parts for the box and mitering the corners is what the table saw sled is for.
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Gary MacKay
Gary MacKay is a designer and box maker who lives with his wife, Helen, in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. He
has been designing, making, and selling boxes in craft galleries for more than 20 years.

Gary first started woodworking during his high school years when he used a jigsaw to make an end table from pine. After buying a band saw in 1985, he sold band saw boxes through consignment shops in northern Vermont. Now, he concentrates on designing and making wooden items that can be cut on a scroll saw. He is currently juried through the South Carolina Artisans Center, one of the craft galleries where his work is on display.

Gary likes to use his scrap wood to make snowflake ornaments and intarsia projects. Whenever he is not working in his woodshop, he can be found out on the golf course or in the vegetable garden. Gary is a frequent contributor to Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts magazine. more