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Intarsia, Inlay, and Segmentation

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Old 01-05-2008, 09:02 PM   #1
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Default Correct double bevel angle for marquetry?

Hi Everyone,

I used to have a link to a retailer who had a downloadable calculator to give the angle to tilt the scrollsaw table for double bevel marquetry. The parameters entered were thicknesses of the two veneers and thickness of the scrollsaw blade. Does anyone have this link or know the formula?

Thanks,
Dave
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Old 01-06-2008, 05:35 AM   #2
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Hi Dave,

I believe that - even correct and precise - theory breaks down when applied to our relatively crude tools. I don't know which scroll saw you are using but pre-adjusting the table to fractions of degrees is probably impossible. I have done a few pieces of marquetry and I've come to the following conclusions:

1. Bevelling veneer is unnecessary (swelling due to glue and firm clamping will take care of the wood lost in the kerf) and counterproductive if you cut more than one layer of veneer at once (varying order of layers in the finished product).

2. Thicker wood: I followed the advice in a good book on scroll-sawing and made and marked a test strip of regular shapes with different angles. The effect of a 1 degree variance with 1/4 inch wood is quite pronounced and gives you a good yardstick to estimate the required angle. You then reduce the angle when using thicker wood / finer blade and increase the angle for thinner wood / coarser blade - often these two effects cancel each other out. The rest is planing/scraping/sanding off the excess. One should always aim for the inlay slightly protruding from the carrier wood as it is easier to take the smaller surface back to the substrate.

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Old 01-06-2008, 08:26 AM   #3
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Hmmm ... anglesaw.zip is an excel spreadsheet application available for free from wood-veneers.com . I can't personally attest to it's accuracy and haven't played with it for quite some time. In theory, the math seems correct though.

All the links in this message are clickable to take you to their download page. Some other interesting downloads are available there too.

Hope it helps.

Andy
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Old 01-06-2008, 11:58 AM   #4
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I use trail and error on some scrap. However, visit Roy King's site for some more detailed instruction on his double-bevel technique.

http://www.scrollsaws.com/RoyMain.html

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Old 01-06-2008, 12:23 PM   #5
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I do the same as Chase, test cut on scrap each time I make inlays. As previosly stated, there are variables when doing double bevels, wood thickness, blade width, table angle. I find even moisture content of the wood has an effect on the final result.
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Old 01-06-2008, 06:10 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrA
1. Bevelling veneer is unnecessary (swelling due to glue and firm clamping will take care of the wood lost in the kerf) and counterproductive if you cut more than one layer of veneer at once (varying order of layers in the finished product).
I do marquetry, and I would not agree with the first part of that. I find that using the smallest blades made (8/0 jewelers blades), I still feel the need to bevel the table for a tight fit. A couple degrees off either way will throw everything off. Of course, it all has to do with the tolerances you are willing to accept. I feel that it must be perfectly tight if that can be achieved, and will do whatever it takes to get that.

The second part of that statement is absolutely true. If you want to cut more layers than your piece and one insert (that you are going to use; sometimes a waste veneer underneath for support is useful), you must do everything flat, and accept the sawkerf.

The angle for 1/42" veneers and an 8/0 jewelers blade is about 15-17 degrees. Play around until you find the exact angle before embarking on your real project.

Tor
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Old 01-06-2008, 11:46 PM   #7
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I do alot of inlay work in 1/4" stock. I always cut test pieces in waste areas. When I first started out I realized that if I put a piece of the stock that will be on top with my table tilted to the left, I could get a good bead on my angle by having the blades left side align with the top right of the piece, (the piece must be square), and the bottom of the piece align with the right side of the blade. Does this make sense? There are certain considerations to be made when getting your angle, such as moisture content, and more so the potential of a piece to absorb glue and swell. Also, if there are alot of turns in a particular inlay, there will be some comprimise to the angle. As a general rule of thumb I like to have my test inlay come up above the top piece about the thickness of a slightly dull penil line. This leaves room for any incongruencies in my cut, as well as swelling during glue up. I can always sand it flat. Better to have some sticking up than being too low.
Ok, there's my 2 cents worth, ok, maybe 3 cents, lol.
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Old 01-06-2008, 11:52 PM   #8
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I forgot to add that I generally use a #5 blade with a 2.5 to 3 degree angle, depending on the actual thickness of the stock. A #2 blade, Which I use when I've got really small details too add, requires a lesser of an angle.
Ok, now I'm done, I think, lol.
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Old 01-07-2008, 02:07 PM   #9
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Hi,

I had to put my thinking cap on for a particular project where I wish to create some marquetry with nasty borders and corners. Hand-cutting / Dremel-routing / hand-cutting these complicated lines in solid oak has little appeal. So I plan to soft-glue the veneer plus paper plus template to the oak and to scrollsaw the pattern in such a way that I create "plugs" which drop down just far enough to bring the veneer almost flat to the main surface. Tilting the scrollsaw table to left and sawing clockwise should do just that. The maths are simple but quite surprising: You divide the thickness of the veneer by the width of the blade, resulting in the sine of the desired angle. Pushing the reverse sine function on the calculator gives you the angle. In my case a whopping 34 degrees!
I withdraw part of my earlier statement, applied maths do save on the number of test pieces - I probably would have started at 10 deg.

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Old 01-07-2008, 03:09 PM   #10
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Hi Dave

Welcome to the forum . You should find the formula you're looking for hidden in this thread.

Gill
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