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Old 07-05-2011, 11:49 AM   #1
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Default Triumph over Waterlox!

Well, it looks as though the cleaning with mineral spirits, straining out the crud from the Waterlox, and use of a foam brush were the answer.

I wiped away every speck I could find, and checked all the surfaces carefully to be sure I didn't overlook anything. I did the inside first, using the overhead light to be sure I didn't miss any spots, then elevated the bowl and did the outside.

I'll let it cure for a couple of weeks, then will give it a final rubdown with steel wool and Wool Lube, which I once bought but never had occasion to use.

One thing I learned that I did not know is that sometimes oil is added to steel wool to keep it from rusting. I don't know of sources for steel wool without any oil, but that's something I'll try to hunt down. The idea of using a brush came from Woodnet, a general woodworking forum that Joe has found very helpful.

Now I'm happy.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:04 PM   #2
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Carole , I have often wondered about the oil when I see people using steel wool on a project .

I haven't used it but assumed it would clean up somehow in the finishing .

Very nice.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:09 PM   #3
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Well you should be happy......your perseverance certainly paid off. That bowl should be named "new product" because if I remember correctly you've never used Waterlox before, and now your are going to use Wood Lube, and as you wrote "never used before".
I'm off to Google Wood Lube, I've never heard of it before. The stuff one learns from this site is just amazing. Well done once again Carole......Sweeeeeet stuff!
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:43 PM   #4
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Roger, I've never had a problem with regular 0000 steel wool, and I like it very much for intermediate rubouts, even though the particles can be problematic. I save sandpaper for dried up drips that have to be removed before the next coat, as I find it less flexible than the steel wool. I always vacuum up particles then wipe the project down with a lightly dampened paper towel, and have not had a problem. My "go-to" finish is one coat of spray shellac to seal and reveal glue spots, a rubdown, then several coats of spray lacquer, rubbing down any sags if I've not been careful, otherwise leaving it alone to let the coats build.

However, every now and then I've noticed that the sandpaper in my bag of miscellaneous pieces has seemed to have oil on it, so I'm wondering if that's coming from the steel wool that's in the same bag. I think it's worth knowing about, if only to confirm that nothing special needs to be changed.

WD--it's Wool Lube, as in "steel wool"--and is supposed to be a good lubricant. You'll find a lot of info about it if you Google it. These purchases always happen to me either when shipping is free, or when I'm trying to make the $25 minimum on Amazon. Glad you like the project--ipeŽis definitely a wood worth working with. Give how much work I put into the darn thing, I would have been really upset if I botched up the finish. However, this is my time to try out new stuff, and a certain amount always ends up as designer firewood.
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Old 07-05-2011, 12:57 PM   #5
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I use either either bronze wool or the plastic ones from 3m. They don;t leave iron slivers that can rust


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Old 07-05-2011, 01:16 PM   #6
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I've not had great experience with the 3M, but I never heard of bronze wool. Does it have the flexibility of steel wool?
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Old 07-05-2011, 03:03 PM   #7
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Carole,
WOW, WOW, WOW! The finish looks great! I think all your effort definetly paid off...just beautiful!!!

I caught a piece of info that I did not think about...use shellac before lacquer to see any remaining glue...GREAT TIP!!! On the lacquer, what type of top coat are you using (i.e. satin, semi-gloss, high gloss)? What brand? For my dot projects I always use high gloss...but on wood I have seen so many comments about not using such a shiny finish. However, I luv the look of the just oiled shiny 'wet' look...how do you achieve that?

Thanx for sharing, and all the great tips you provide along the way!
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Old 07-05-2011, 04:02 PM   #8
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Kim, I've been using Minwax gloss lacquer, and find it a really nice, user friendly product. It dries really quickly, so it's easy to re-coat and not likely to sag.

Since the bowls I make are so glue-intensive, and I always use my fingers to apply the glue, invariably there are glue spots that have to be sanded off. Although mineral spirits will also make them visible, I think the shellac works better. I mark the spots with chalk as soon as the shellac is dry enough to do so. That makes it easy to find them once the finish is fully dry so I can sand them away. Shellac is also good to seal the wood before flocking box insides--the paint is less likely to get absorbed too quickly into the wood.

I then use the spray lacquer, in as many coats as needed, and a final rubout if I need to tame the gloss.

The Waterlox I used is the "original" formulation. They have other formulations of different degrees of glossiness. According to the instructions, the gloss should decrease a bit as the finish cures, so I won't know for a few weeks how this formula works out. The down side is the drying time. Also, ipeŽ, the main wood of the box, takes a tremendous shine very easily, so I don't know how it will work on less dense wood. However, the product has been around for a long time, and is apparently well-regarded, so it's something you might look into. But, if the gloss Minwax lacquer will give you the look you want, it's much, much quicker and easier.

BTW, I sent you a PM yesterday, so take a look when you get a chance.

Glad you like the bowl, and I hope my finishing experiences give you some useful ideas for your own (beautiful) work.
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