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Butterfly Box Correction

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Correction to the Butterfly Box pattern that appeared in Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts Spring 2014 (Issue 54)

SSW54 - Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts - Spring 2014In the Butterfly Box article by Gary MacKay, which appeared in Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts Spring 2014 (Issue 54), there was an error on the pattern.

On page 30, the pattern for the butterfly box is incorrect: in the center, the bottom of the butterfly's body should be shown and cut as part of the box sides and bottom.

Readers can trace the bottom of the body from the pattern on page 29. (The lead photo shows that the bottom of the body is supported by the box sides/bottom.) The top of the body and the antennae are NOT part of the box sides/bottom. They are cut from the dark brown body wood only.

Scroll down for a corrected pattern.

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Comments (12 posted):

Scrolling Days on 02/11/2014 16:04:44
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Thanks for providing a corrected pattern. I had actually done the recommended action of tracing the body from page 29 over to the pattern on page 30, only I carried both the head (sans antennae) and the body over, which I think it came out nice as well.
Fay P on 02/11/2014 18:35:12
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I traced the body also, but that is hard place to sand. I might do the pattern again leaving out the body end. It would be easier to sand it and then glue down the body.
Scrolling Days on 02/11/2014 19:31:25
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I traced the body also, but that is hard place to sand. I might do the pattern again leaving out the body end. It would be easier to sand it and then glue down the body. I agree, Fay...it was tricky to sand inside those deep crevices. I pretty much snuck a sheet of sandpaper in there, and pulled it back and forth like floss. It's hard to get pressure on the paper that way, though.
Sandy Oaks on 02/12/2014 12:36:31
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Glad I read this thread. I started the box side out of one piece of 1 1/2" pine and cut the insides. I glued a bottom on and now ready to cut the outside. With what Fay said, I will cut as designed with no butterfly bottom. Easier to sand.
Fay P on 02/14/2014 18:29:40
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Shawn I did that same thing you did so mine looks like crap in there and I will make another one with out that little body end in there. It would be much easier to sand and the spindle sander will get in there or the Dremel sander will. Have a great day Fay
jhardin2elp on 02/25/2014 19:04:23
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Just finished final touches and flocking. Did not include back part of body and box looks great without it. Used Saran wrap over chambers then placed lid inserts on wrap, glued with gel super glue and lowered tops onto inserts and adjusted for fit. When glue was somewhat set lifted lid with insert and placed them on bench and weighted down until glue full set.
Skipp on 03/21/2014 11:39:02
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I also completed the butterfly body (used maple) as per original design and it looks great. I intentionally left off the antennae as I liked the look of the box on the front of the magazine (and it's one less piece to snap off later). Skipp
Scrolling Days on 03/22/2014 10:53:40
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I also completed the butterfly body (used maple) as per original design and it looks great. I intentionally left off the antennae as I liked the look of the box on the front of the magazine (and it's one less piece to snap off later). Skipp If you can find time to post a picture of your project, Skip, we would love to see it!
Skipp on 03/22/2014 15:30:10
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Shawn, I have attached 4 photos of the butterfly. Two show the inside which I lined with felt. The lid liners are red cedar. Skipp
Scrolling Days on 03/22/2014 23:12:29
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Hey, those are really sharp! I like the blue liner, and the red cedar under the lids. What woods do you have for the wings? I'm thinking I see oak, ash and maple there, but I'm probably totally wrong. :)
Skipp on 03/24/2014 13:53:59
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Thanks Shawn, the woods from bottom to top are oak, cedar, pine and the reddish orange is either bloodwood or paduak. (Can't remember the name). The body is maple. Interesting lesson I have learned - I have several unique pieces of wood including types I had never heard of before scrolling. A dozen or so years ago I went out and bought a variety of exotic woods to start my new hobby. One them was zebrawood which, as I'm sure you're aware looks like zebra stripes. It looked so special and unique that I could never find a suitable project for it. It would have been best suited for a wooden zebra but that would kind of defeat the purpose of making a zebra out of wood right? So, after so many years of waiting I finally made the seahorse puzzle (Scrollsaw Woodworkers issue 47, 2012) out of the zebrawood. It didn't look great but I finally used the zebrawood. Lesson here - buy the wood after you have a project in mind. cheers
wood-n-things on 08/03/2014 11:35:25
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The sea horse turned out nice. If you have enough zebrawood left try a lion fish...
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Author info
Gary MacKay
Gary MacKay is a designer and box maker who lives with his wife, Helen, in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. He
has been designing, making, and selling boxes in craft galleries for more than 20 years.

Gary first started woodworking during his high school years when he used a jigsaw to make an end table from pine. After buying a band saw in 1985, he sold band saw boxes through consignment shops in northern Vermont. Now, he concentrates on designing and making wooden items that can be cut on a scroll saw. He is currently juried through the South Carolina Artisans Center, one of the craft galleries where his work is on display.

Gary likes to use his scrap wood to make snowflake ornaments and intarsia projects. Whenever he is not working in his woodshop, he can be found out on the golf course or in the vegetable garden. Gary is a frequent contributor to Scroll Saw Woodworking & Crafts magazine. more